Assignments

  • Reading at home:  Read with your child and encourage him/her to read to you as often as possible.  Consider reinforcing the reading strategies at home that were given to you during conferences.  These stragies will help strengthen your child's skills to identify new vocabulary.  Dr. Lucinda Clark shared another fun reading strategy with our classroom, called the "Five Finger Fix Up".  Ask your child to teach it to you!  Focus on helping your child read expressively by modeling this skill.  Encourage him/her to pay close attention to punctuation and change his/her voice to reflect this.   

  • Weekly Words:  Please practice the spelling & sight word lists throughout the week; you may also like to review the meanings of the Robust Vocabulary words, often referred to in class as our "grown up" vocabulary words.  Assessments will be given on Fridays.  Sight words will be assessed on weekly tests, and on informal assessments throughout the weeks.  A cummulative assessment will be given at the end of each nine weeks.

  • Practice at home will increase your child's ability to recall the weekly concepts and words with confidence and speed. An ideal practice session will last approximately 15 minutes.  Following is a suggested the at-home/homework schedule (to begin mid September): 

    • Monday:  Practice spelling & sight words; review the first 3 vocabulary words. 

    • Tuesday:  Complete spelling homework & review the first 3 vocabulary words.

    • Wednesday: Practice spelling & sight words; review all 6 weekly vocabulary words; and complete reading homework

    • Thursday: Practice spelling & sight words and review all 6 weekly vocabulary words; read for at least 15 minutes

    • Friday:   Be prepared for the spelling & literacy weekly quizzes.          

  • Check the weekly updates section of the website and the daily behavior calendar for updates or changes to the schedule.

  • Writing: The amount of writing your child can complete may vary.  I always ask boys and girls to show me their best work.  The writing goals change from the beginning to the end of the year.  The ultimate goal is for your child to write four developmentally appropriate sentences using learned capitalization and punctuation.  It is my opinion that quality is more important than quantityYou can give your child opportunities to write at home by asking for his/her help to write a grocery list, writing a note to another family member, by listing rhyming words or spelling words, writing a silly sentence/story, or you can use your imagination and think of another idea.  

  • Math:  When exploring the variety of math skills taught this year, your child will use manipulatives & play games that will allow him/her to develop greater understanding of specific concepts.  In the 2010-2011 school year, our district adopted some new curricula including the Expressions Math Series which will be supplemented by specific Investigations Math Units.  Both of these programs are designed not only to teach students mathematical processes, but to grant them opportunities for exploration, questioning, and discussing their experiences.  We are very excited about the positive impact these programs have on students' understanding/development and their attitudes toward Math!  Here is a glance at the math skills that will be taught this year: 

    • Number Sense:  assigning value to, sequencing and ordering numbers up to one hundred; using correct number formation; identifying odd and even numbers; skip counting by twos, fives and tens; comparing the value of numbers by using greater than and less than signs; reading and writing number words and ordinals (1st, 2nd, etc.); basic addition and subtraction; using a ruler to measure to the nearest inch and half inch; understanding of basic fractions including 1/2, 1/3, 1/4; identifying coins and counting combined values of various coins (pennies, nickels and dimes & quarters), telling time to the nearest hour & half hour; adding and subtracting two digit numbers (both with & without regrouping); identifying place value (hundreds, tens and ones).

    • Using a Variety of Problem Solving Skills: identifying and continuing patterns; using graphing and logic skills; adding and subtracting numbers with sums/differences of 12 or less using various strategies; & using logical reasoning. 

  • Thank you for your interest and support.  You play a vital role in your child's education!